CDC: ‘Rapidly growing’ Salmonella outbreak has hit nearly 2 dozen states, source unknown

CDC: ‘Rapidly growing’ Salmonella outbreak has hit nearly 2 dozen states, source unknown

Nearly two dozen states have been hit by a rapidly growing Salmonella outbreak that has already sickened hundreds of people. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday announced an additional 87 illnesses have been reported and 8 new states have been affected by the outbreak since Tuesday. The agency has not yet identified the

Nearly two dozen states have been hit by a rapidly growing Salmonella outbreak that has already sickened hundreds of people.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday announced an additional 87 illnesses have been reported and 8 new states have been affected by the outbreak since Tuesday. The agency has not yet identified the source of the bacteria.

Though outbreaks of the bacteria can usually be traced back to a food source, no specific food, grocery store, or restaurant has yet been linked to the outbreak. Health officials are interviewing and asking those who have become ill about the foods they ate.

As of Friday’s update, there are 212 reported cases spread over 23 states. While 31 people have been hospitalized, no deaths have yet been reported.

Reported cases span the nation, from California to Maine. Oregon and Utah are the hardest hit states, according to a CDC map.

If you have symptoms, the CDC advises you to contact your healthcare provider, write down what you ate the week before you became sick and contact the local health department.

The CDC says symptoms of a Salmonella infection include diarrhea, fever and abdominal cramps. People sickened by the bacteria typically have symptoms in 6 hours to six days after being exposed.

Salmonella may spread from the intestines to the bloodstream and then to other places in the body, but most people most people recover without treatment. The illness typically lasts four to seven days.

In rare cases, salmonella infection can cause death.

People with weakened immune systems, children younger than 5 years and adults older than 65 years are more likely to have severe illness.

Contributing: Susan Selasky, Detroit Free Press

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